ballad of the fallen angel

the darkest nights of the soul

Christians and Halloween – Part 2

I am now being torn apart between being kind and being right. But I know that I also have the responsibility to spread the truth and contradict and let other people know truth vs lies.

So I have researched and read things about Halloween and carefully weighs both sides of the spectrum: those who thinks it’s okay to celebrate it and those, like me, who is not okay with it.

Let’s look at some important things I have found from Bibleinfo.

The history of Halloween

The origin of Halloween as we know it, began over 1900 years ago in England, Ireland, and Northern France. It was a Celtic celebration of the new year, called Samhain /ˈsouən/ which occurred on November 1. The Celtic druids revered it as the biggest holiday of the year and emphasized that day as the time when the souls of the dead supposedly could mingle with the living. Bonfires (bone fires = human remains) were a large aspect of this holiday as well.

Samhain remained popular until St. Patrick and other Christian missionaries arrived in the area. As the population began to convert to Christianity the holiday began to lose its popularity. However, instead of eradicating pagan practices such as “Halloween” or Samhain, the church instead used these holidays with a Christian twist to bring paganism and Christianity together, making it easier for local populations to convert to the state religion.

Another tradition is the druidic belief that during the night of November 1, demons, witches, and evil spirits freely roamed the earth with joy to greet the arrival of “their season”—the long nights and early dark of the winter months. The demons had their fun with poor mortals that night, frightening, harming, and even playing all kinds of mean tricks on them. The only way, it seemed, for scared humans to escape the persecution of the demons was to offer them things they liked, especially fancy foods and sweets. Or, in order to escape the fury of these horrible creatures, a human could disguise himself as one of them and join in their roaming. In this way, they would recognize the human as a demon or witch and the human would not be bothered that night.

During the Roman empire, there was the custom of eating or giving away fruit, especially apples, on Halloween. It spread to neighboring countries; to Ireland and Scotland from Britain, and to the Slavic countries from Austria. It is probably based upon a celebration of the Roman goddess Pomona, to whom gardens and orchards were dedicated. Since the annual Feast of Pomona was held on November 1, the relics of that observance became part of our Halloween celebration, for instance, the familiar tradition of “dunking” for apples.

Today costumes take the place of disguises and candy has replaced fruits and other fancy foods as children go door-to-door trick-or-treating. Originally trick-or-treating began as “souling,” when children would go door-to-door on Halloween, with soul cakes, singing and saying prayers for the dead. Over the course of history Halloween’s visible practices have changed with the culture of the day, but the purpose of honoring the dead, veiled in fun and festivities, has remained the same.

Should Christians celebrate Halloween?

As a logical thinking person, consider for a moment what you are celebrating and what Halloween is all about. Is the holiday uplifting? Is Halloween pure? Is it lovely, praiseworthy, or of good report? Philippians 4:8 says, “Finally, brethren, whatever things are true, whatever things are noble, whatever things are just, whatever things are pure, whatever things are lovely, whatever things are of good report, if there is any virtue and if there is anything praiseworthy—meditate on these things.” Is Halloween based on godly themes such as the idea of peace, freedom and salvation or does the holiday bring to mind feelings of fear, oppression and bondage?

Additionally, does the Bible sanction witchcraft, witches, and sorcery? On the contrary, the Bible makes it clear that these practices are an abomination to the Lord. The Bible goes on to say in Leviticus 20:27 that anyone who practiced witchcraft, soothsaying, sorcery should be killed. Deuteronomy 18:9-13 adds, “When you come into the land which the Lord your God is giving you, you shall not learn to follow the abominations of those nations. There shall not be found among you … one who practices witchcraft, or a soothsayer, or one who interprets omens, or a sorcerer, or one who conjures spells, or a medium, or a spiritist, or one who calls up the dead. For all who do these things are an abomination to the Lord.”

Is it wrong to celebrate Halloween?

Let’s look at what the Bible adds to this topic in Ephesians 5:11, “And have no fellowship with the unfruitful works of darkness, but rather expose them.” This text is calling us to not only have no association with any type of dark activity BUT ALSO to shed light on this topic to those around us. As stated earlier in this article, Halloween was not exposed by the church for what it was, but rather was incorporated into church holy days. Are Christians responding in the same way today?

As you think about Halloween—its origins and what it stands for—would it be best to spend time dwelling upon its themes or to shed light upon what lies below the surface of this holiday’s celebration. God is calling humanity to follow Him and to “come out from among them and be separate, says the Lord. Do not touch what is unclean, and I will receive you” (2 Corinthians 6:17).

I have also watched Beth, who was a former witch talk about Christians celebrating Halloween. She mentioned that there are three important holidays from the satanic calendar:

  1. Christmas
  2. Easter
  3. Halloween

She also mentioned that Anton LaVey, founder of the church of satan, once said that he is “glad that Christian parents let their children worship the devil at least one night out of the year. Welcome to Halloween.” Beth also mentioned that witches curse those candies that are being given away to children. Beth said that Halloween is already evil and you cannot take away evil from Halloween. She begs Christians to STOP celebrating and participating in this demonic holiday because it doesn’t look right in the eyes of God who sent Jesus on the cross to die for our sins.

I have also checked a former Satanist talk about Christians celebrating Halloween – John Ramirez. John became a high priest in Palo Mayombe, a form of African Spiritualism. Ramirez, now a pastor, knows all about the dark reality of Halloween. He once sacrificed animals as part of satanic rituals and his friends even knew him as “Lucifer’s son.” Ramirez says that in his opinion the other events Christians hold instead of Halloween, such as “Trunk or Treat” nights, are really no different.  

John also said that Halloween isn’t just about candies and costumes – there’s a much darker side to it.  For more of John Ramirez’s story, read here.

There’s also the CBN News Facebook poll, 87% of believers feel that Christians should not celebrate Halloween, while 13% believe it’s okay.

Just to be clear, my personal stand on this matter is that WE SHOULD NOT CELEBRATE Halloween or even participate on this holiday. We should be educated and be informed about this. And if you have already participated, just come into the saving grace of the Lord Jesus Christ and ask for forgiveness. Ask Him to cleanse you. To break the curse that you have put upon yourself by participating on this holiday.

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Christians and Halloween

How do I even start this one? I really don’t know where to begin.

* First, this occasion really gives me the creepy feelings.

* Second, it has been shared by Believers that it is not a Godly event.

I tried checking any websites discussing Halloween and found one from bibleinfo.com a great insight.

First of all, understand that Halloween is mostly a western custom and it has no direct reference in the Bible. However, there are Biblical principles that directly relate to the celebration of Halloween. Perhaps the best way to understand how Halloween relates to the Bible is to look at the meaning of Halloween and its history.

So here we go, I will copy the information and the link was already noted above.

What Does Halloween Mean?

The word Halloween literally means the evening before All Hallows Day or All Saint’s Day, celebrated on November 1. Halloween is also the shortened name of Allhalloween, All Hallows’ Evening and All Saint’s Eve which is celebrated on October 31. The origin and meaning of Halloween is derived from ancient Celtic harvest festivals, but more recently we think of Halloween as a night filled with candy, trick-or-treating, pumpkins, ghosts and death.

The History of Halloween

The origin of Halloween as we know it, began over 1900 years ago in England, Ireland, and Northern France. It was a Celtic celebration of the new year, called Samhain which occurred on November 1. The Celtic druids revered it as the biggest holiday of the year and emphasized that day as the time when the souls of the dead supposedly could mingle with the living. Bonfires were a large aspect of this holiday as well.

Samhain remained popular until St. Patrick and other Christian missionaries arrived in the area. As the population began to convert to Christianity the holiday began to lose its popularity. However, instead of eradicating pagan practices such as “Halloween” or Samhain, the church instead used these holidays with a Christian twist to bring paganism and Christianity together, making it easier for local populations to convert to the state religion.

Another tradition is the druidic belief that during the night of November 1, demons, witches, and evil spirits freely roamed the earth with joy to greet the arrival of “their season” – the long nights and early dark of the winter months. The demons had their fun with poor mortals that night, frightening, harming, and even playing all kinds of mean tricks on them. The only way, it seemed, for scared humans to escape the persecution of the demons was to offer them things they liked, especially fancy foods and sweets. Or, in order to escape the fury of these horrible creatures, a human could disguise himself as one of them and join in their roaming. In this way they would recognize the human as a demon or witch and the human would not be bothered that night.

During the Roman empire there was the custom of eating or giving away fruit, especially apples, on Halloween. It spread to neighboring countries; to Ireland and Scotland from Britain, and to the Slavic countries from Austria. It is probably based upon a celebration of the Roman goddess Pomona, to whom gardens and orchards were dedicated. Since the annual Feast of Pomona was held on November 1, the relics of that observance became part of our Halloween celebration, for instance the familiar tradition of “dunking” for apples.

Today costumes take the place of disguises and candy has replaced fruits and other fancy foods as children go door-to-door trick-or-treating. Originally trick-or-treating began as “souling,” when children would go door-to-door on Halloween, with soul cakes, singing and saying prayers for the dead. Over the course of history Halloween’s visible practices have changed with the culture of the day, but the purpose of honoring the dead, veiled in fun and festivities, has remained the same. The question remains, is celebrating Halloween bad or unbiblical?

Should Christians Celebrate Halloween?

As a logical thinking person, consider for a moment what you are celebrating and what Halloween is all about. Is the holiday uplifting? Is Halloween pure? Is it lovely, praiseworthy, or of good report? Philippians 4:8 says, “Finally, brethren, whatsoever things are true, whatsoever things are honest, whatsoever things are just, whatsoever things are pure, whatsoever things are lovely, whatsoever things are of good report; if there be any virtue, and if there be any praise, think on these things.” Is Halloween based on godly themes such as the idea of peace, freedom and salvation or does the holiday bring to mind feelings of fear, obsession and bondage?

Additionally, does the Bible sanction witchcraft, witches, and sorcery? On the contrary, the Bible makes it clear that these practices are an abomination to the Lord. The Bible goes on to say in Leviticus 20:27 that anyone who practiced witchcraft, soothsaying, sorcery should be killed. Deuteronomy 18:9-13 adds, “When you come into the land which the Lord your God is giving you, you shall not learn to follow the abominations of those nations. There shall not be found among you … one who practices witchcraft, or a soothsayer, or one who interprets omens, or a sorcerer, or one who conjures spells, or a medium, or a spiritist, or one who calls up the dead. For all who do these things are an abomination to the Lord.”

Now, is it wrong to celebrate Halloween? Well, Ephesians 5:11 says “And have no fellowship with the unfruitful works of darkness, but rather expose them.”

Halloween was not exposed by the church for what it was, but rather was incorporated into church holy days. Are Christians responding in the same way today?As you think about Halloween—its origins and what it stands for—would it be best to spend time dwelling upon its themes or to shed light upon what lies below the surface of this holiday’s celebration. God is calling humanity to follow Him and to “come out from among them, and be ye separate, saith the Lord, and touch not the unclean thing” (2 Corinthians 6:17).

So please, brothers and sisters, I hope this article will help us understand why we don’t need to participate in Halloween.

Easter Sunday and the Pagan Beliefs

church bunnies

Today, April 1, 2018, is the first Sunday of the month and Easter Sunday. In Matthew 28:6 NKJV says “He is not here: for he is risen, as he said. Come, see the place where the Lord lay.” This is where the true meaning of Easter ha to be. Or has it?

Let us look at the reasons why we call Easter Sunday Easter and not Resurrection Sunday.

Eostre

[1] It is often assumed that the name Easter comes from a pagan figure called Eastre (or Eostre) who was celebrated as the goddess of spring by the Saxons of Northern Europe. [2] She was associated with spring and fertility, and celebrated around the vernal equinox. [3] The only mention of Eastre comes from a passing reference in the writings of the Venerable Bede, an eighth-century monk and historian. Bede wrote,

“Eosturmononath has a name which is now translated as ‘Paschal month,’ and which was once called after a goddess of theirs named Eostre, in whose honor feasts were celebrated in that month. Now they designate the Paschal season by her name, calling the joys of the new rite by the time-honoured name of the old observance” (De Temporum Ratione).

And that’s it. Eostre is not mentioned in any other ancient writing; we have found no shrines, no altars, nothing to document the worship of Eastre. It is possible that Bede simply extrapolated the name of the goddess from the name of the month. And who was the Venerable Bede? [4] Bede (673–735) was a Catholic monk in England; he is known as the Father of English History and was one of the most learned men in Europe at the time. Bede’s tomb in Durham Cathedral contains an inscription giving him the title “Venerable,” meaning that some officials in the Roman Catholic Church had found his person and life to be worthy of veneration. Bede was made a saint and declared a doctor of the church in 1899.

Inanna (Ishtar)

[5] One theory that has been put forward is that the Easter story of crucifixion and resurrection is symbolic of rebirth and renewal and retells the cycle of the seasons, the death and return of the sun.

According to some scholars, such as Dr. Tony Nugent, teacher of Theology and Religious Studies at Seattle University, and Presbyterian minister, the Easter story comes from the Sumerian legend of Damuzi (Tammuz) and his wife Inanna (Ishtar), an epic myth called “The Descent of Inanna” found inscribed on cuneiform clay tablets dating back to 2100 BC. When Tammuz dies, Ishtar is grief–stricken and follows him to the underworld. In the underworld, she enters through seven gates, and her worldly attire is removed. “Naked and bowed low” she is judged, killed, and then hung on display. In her absence, the earth loses its fertility, crops cease to grow and animals stop reproducing. Unless something is done, all life on earth will end. Dr Nugent is quick to point out that drawing parallels between the story of Jesus and the epic of Inanna “doesn’t necessarily mean that there wasn’t a real person, Jesus, who was crucified, but rather that, if there was, the story about it is structured and embellished in accordance with a pattern that was very ancient and widespread.”

The Sumerian goddess Inanna is known outside of Mesopotamia by her Babylonian name, “Ishtar”. In ancient Canaan Ishtar is known as Astarte, and her counterparts in the Greek and Roman pantheons are known as Aphrodite and Venus. In the 4th Century, when Christians identified the exact site in Jerusalem where the empty tomb of Jesus had been located, they selected the spot where a temple of Aphrodite (Astarte/Ishtar/Inanna) stood. The temple was torn down and the So Church of the Holy Sepulchre was built, the holiest church in the Christian world.

Dr Nugent points out that the story of Inanna and Damuzi is just one of a number of accounts of dying and rising gods that represent the cycle of the seasons and the stars. For example, the resurrection of Egyptian Horus; the story of Mithras, who was worshipped at Springtime; and the tale of Dionysus, resurrected by his grandmother. Among these stories are prevailing themes of fertility, conception, renewal, descent into darkness, and the triumph of light over darkness or good over evil.

Easter Bunny and Easter Eggs

[6] The Easter Bunny comes from these pagan rites of spring as well, but more from pagan Germany than pagan Britain. Eighteenth-century German settlers brought “Oschter Haws” (never knew he had a name, did you?) to America, where Pennsylvania Dutch settlers prepared nests for him in the garden or barn. On Easter Eve, the rabbit laid his colored eggs in the nests in payment. In Germany, old Oschter lays red eggs on Maundy Thursday. If anyone knows why children in an agrarian society would believe a rabbit lays eggs, please tell us or a historian near you. We’re all dying to know. [7] In Germanic mythology, it is said that Ostara healed a wounded bird she found in the woods by changing it into a hare. Still partially a bird, the hare showed its gratitude to the goddess by laying eggs as gifts.

The Encyclopedia Britannica clearly explains the pagan traditions associated with the egg: “The egg as a symbol of fertility and of renewed life goes back to the ancient Egyptians and Persians, who had also the custom of colouring and eating eggs during their spring festival.” In ancient Egypt, an egg symbolised the sun, while for the Babylonians, the egg represents the hatching of the Venus Ishtar, who fell from heaven to the Euphrates.

The legend of the Easter bunny bringing eggs appears to have been brought to the United States by settlers from Germany. The German tradition of the Easter bunny (or Oschter Haws) migrated to America in the 1700s, accompanying German immigrants, many of whom settled in Pennsylvania. Over the past 200 years, the Easter bunny has become the most commercially recognized symbol of Easter in the United States. Other countries use other animals as the symbol of Easter, such as the cuckoo (in Switzerland).

In legend, the Easter bunny, also called the Easter hare and the spring bunny, brings baskets filled with colored eggs, candy, and sometimes toys to the homes of children on the night before Easter, in much the same way as Santa Claus is said to deliver presents on Christmas Eve. The Easter Bunny will either put the baskets in a designated place or hide them somewhere in the house or garden for the children to find when they wake up in the morning, giving rise to the tradition of the Easter egg hunt. Obviously, none of this comes from the Bible.

Because of the commercialization and possible pagan origins of Easter, many churches prefer to call it “Resurrection Sunday.” The rationale is that, the more we focus on Christ and His work on our behalf, the better. Paul says that without the resurrection of Christ our faith is futile (1 Corinthians 15:17). What more wonderful reason could we have to celebrate! Whether we call it “Easter” or “Resurrection Sunday,” what is important is the reason for our celebration, which is that Christ is alive, making it possible for us to have eternal life (Romans 6:4)!

Jesus At The Center

It’s rare that I write 2 succeeding blogs in 1 day, let alone 1 month. But after writing what I wrote earlier lambasting and ranting about age and leadership, I have now calmed down. Plus a shot of Korean wine and coffee helped. Not sure how but it gave me headache.

Seriously though, I led the Praise and Worship earlier today, January 28, 2018, and our last song was, guess it… Yes, JESUS AT THE CENTER by Israel & New Breed.

I was able to think clearly after 2 large cups of coffee and a shot of alcohol and it made me realized something. Is Jesus at my center?

Part of the song says:

Nothing else matters,

nothing in this world will do.

Jesus You’re the center,

and everything revolves around you.

While writing this blog, I am playing in constant repetition the 2 versions of the song.

Jesus be the center of my life,

Jesus be the center of my life

From beginning to the end

It will always be,

It’s always been You Jesus

I know I’ve made a mistake of taking things and turn it into one big mess but, I guess the good thing about it is, me – questioning my own faith and where it’s foundation is laid. I started checking my heart and praying to God to correct my feelings. I asked one Pastor to pray for me because, at the end of the day, I know it is my pride that is hurting more than anything. I just hope I am not too late.

From my heart to heavens

Jesus be the center,

It’s all about You,

Yes it’s all about You

I asked God for forgiveness. I asked Him to give me a servant’s heart. I asked God for help.

Jesus, be the center of my everything.

for my daughter

This is for my daughter.

I would want her to know how I love her and how I will strive not just for her future but for her siblings as well.

My daughter has ADHD. She’s a slow learner. She has difficulty remembering things and lessons and all. But she is good with arts. With colors.

We went to a school nearby to have her assessed. I was expecting a bit but turns out, everything has been a rollercoaster. I didn’t see it coming. Or I refused to see it coming. I forgot that it’s not just the school’s responsibility but mine too as a father, as a parent. My daughter was not accepted because of her situation. She can’t read that good, she doesn’t speak that well.

To whoever reads this, I am asking for help. You can visit this site, MEG project for details. You can send me messages on how to help us out. Please.

 

my daughter has ADHD

I had my daughter diagnosed last October 2014 by a Child Developmental Specialist based in Region 4-A. After that, it was time to learn the ins and outs of taking care of her. I checked the internet on how to take care of my kid. I gathered all that I can in order to help her. Turns out, I still need help outside the internet.

We had to enroll her to a special school. A school that not only will teach her about academics but will also give her the therapy that she needs. We went to the school that the Specialist recommended. It was just about right for her. The surrounding is conducive for her and her learning. But the fee is a bit too much. I do understand why. It’s not an ordinary school. It is an institution that handles kids with ADHD and Autism for one. They not only teach the kids on how to read and write and count, but they also do therapy. Therapy that my daughter needs. We had to enroll her ASAP because she is already aged 6 and she is getting older. She needs to train herself and control herself.

As of the moment, I started a crowd funding group at Facebook. I have to. I have to ask help from friends and some family members about this. I can’t do it alone.

If you want to help, my contact info is on the Facebook page.

The message of Job

The story of Job.

Everybody seemed familiar with the story of this incredible man. A man of faith. A man who has everything then lost it all.

We went to church this morning for the worship service. This is the first time we are attending the Church of Biblical Truth here in our subdivision. I know who the Pastor here, but he was not there when we arrive. Instead, they have a lady who will be speaking. She said that she has prepared a message for the last 2 weeks and God is giving her a different message. She bargained with God. Then Sunday morning came and as she was preparing, the message felt stronger and she had changed the subject of her message. She does not even know why, but she chose to follow God’s direction.

We arrived with 4 kids. We have 2 nephews and my own 2 kids. I was not really expecting God to reveal things to me because Pastor Jess is not around so I just sat down and try to listen to the speaker. When she spoke of how the message has been changed, I was like “Okay. God led her to change it.” Then she revealed the message was of a man who has everything then lost everything and God replaced everything that he lost. That man was Job.

The story revolves around how Job was one of the people that pleased God and how God brags about him. Then Satan came to have a little “challenge” so to speak. They put Job to the test, they were trying to know what will be the man’s decision will be. They took all of his possessions, his slaves, his livestock, his children, and they caused him great pain by giving him some skin disease. One of the prayers I remember from him was “…Naked I came from my mother’s womb, and naked shall I return. The LORD gave, and the LORD has taken away; blessed be the name of the LORD.” Job 1:21 English Standard Version.

Job with his 3 friends
Job with his 3 friends

Why was this relevant to me? Why did I feel that God intentionally made me go to that church this Sunday and had me listen to the speaker? It’s because He wants me to learn and know that He is still in control. God wants me to hear how Job responded. How Job’s life was more miserable and painful than mine. I lost my job, I am in need of a financial resource because my wife is 6 months pregnant and my daughter’s still going to school, debts and bills needed to be paid…

God wanted me to hear that HE IS STILL IN CONTROL. I have forgotten how it feels to be assured by God. I have been complaining and whining. I have questioned God again and again. I know I can question God because He has given me freedom to speak and think on my own. But my line of questioning is more of a literal questions.

I have lost some of my faith along the way and I know how it is to go against God and be under His grace. I have learned how to suffer and accept the fact that I have sinned. And the story of Job made me realize, God does what He knows is best for me. Now I can never question His wisdom, but I may ask for His grace to be with me in times like this.

After God answered Job, He blessed Job more. God gave him what he lost and more. All that Job did was to trust in the Lord. TRUST IN THE LORD.

My story so far.

 

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